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OPPOSE AB 12 and AB 61


Next Tuesday, June 18, the Senate Public Safety Committee is scheduled to hear anti-gun bills, AB 12 and AB 61.  

OPPOSE - Assembly Bill 12, sponsored by Assembly Member Jacqui Irwin (D-44), would extend the duration of California’s gun violence restraining order law from one year to five. Meaning a person could be prohibited from owning and possessing firearms for five years at a time without ever being adjudicated mentally ill or convicted of a crime, but based on third party allegations.

OPPOSE - Assembly Bill 61, sponsored by Assembly Member Philip Ting (D-19), would expand the list of those eligible to file “gun violence” restraining orders (GVRO) beyond the currently authorized reporters which include immediate family and law enforcement.  The new list is expanded to employers, coworkers and employees of a secondary or postsecondary school that the person has attended in the last 6 months.  GVRO’s can remove a person’s Second Amendment Rights, not based on criminal convictions or mental adjudications, but based on third party allegations often without due process until weeks after a person’s rights have been suspended.​ 

OPPOSE AB 12 and AB 61


Next Tuesday, June 18, the Senate Public Safety Committee is scheduled to hear anti-gun bills, AB 12 and AB 61.  

OPPOSE - Assembly Bill 12, sponsored by Assembly Member Jacqui Irwin (D-44), would extend the duration of California’s gun violence restraining order law from one year to five. Meaning a person could be prohibited from owning and possessing firearms for five years at a time without ever being adjudicated mentally ill or convicted of a crime, but based on third party allegations.

OPPOSE - Assembly Bill 61, sponsored by Assembly Member Philip Ting (D-19), would expand the list of those eligible to file “gun violence” restraining orders (GVRO) beyond the currently authorized reporters which include immediate family and law enforcement.  The new list is expanded to employers, coworkers and employees of a secondary or postsecondary school that the person has attended in the last 6 months.  GVRO’s can remove a person’s Second Amendment Rights, not based on criminal convictions or mental adjudications, but based on third party allegations often without due process until weeks after a person’s rights have been suspended.​